Embrace the chaos and stay ambigious!

 

Are you aware of an UX issue? Great, I can help you find another one! I may even reveal a few other problems to add to your list. And yes, I do also support in finding solutions. Because I embrace challenges, complexity and ambiguity.

 

Embrace the chaos and stay ambigious!

 

Hello, my name is Judith. I do user experience research, design and strategy … sometimes I consider myself a »business therapist« treating diseases with empathy, curiosity and passion: I identify needs, investigate products, processes, and stakeholders and I help translating insights into concepts. 

In the beginning were grids and guidelines. As a design trainee, I gathered my first experiences in a medical design company, followed by a Luxembourg-based communication agency. After about five years, I started doing editorial design and continued freelancing for various clients in different fields. Lessons learned: Choosing and using tools wisely.

Bored by nice-looking but somewhat static things, I eventually studied Interface Design and graduated at the University of Applied Sciences Potsdam. Investigating process flows and team collaboration, I here mastered to make decisions and defend ideas – not »just because«, but for a reasonable »why«! Lessons learned: Accepting quite some challenges.

Admitting that first approaches often initially fail, I know about the importance of doing research, focusing on the users' needs and contextual inquiries. Try and error is the mission in this respect – for the sake of steady iteration and improvement. Lessons learned: If at first you don't succeed, better get used to it.

At the moment I am working at the SAP Innovation Center in Potsdam, supporting the Knowledge Workspace for the Digital Enterprise project.

 

Embrace the chaos and stay ambigious!

 

In the beginning were grids and guidelines. As a design trainee, I gathered my first experiences in a medical design company, followed by a Luxembourg-based communication agency. After about five years, I started doing editorial design and continued freelancing for various clients in different fields. Lessons learned: Choosing and using tools wisely.
Bored by nice-looking but somewhat static things, I eventually studied Interface Design and graduated at the University of Applied Sciences Potsdam. Investigating process flows and team collaboration, I here mastered to make decisions and defend ideas – not »just because«, but for a reasonable »why«! Lessons learned: Accepting quite some challenges.
Admitting that first approaches often initially fail, I know about the importance of doing research, focusing on the users' needs and contextual inquiries. Try and error is the mission in this respect – for the sake of steady iteration and improvement. Lessons learned: If at first you don't succeed, better get used to it.

 

 

 

»Scope« a business e-mail client
 
in collaboration with Karen Hentschel and Jana Kühl 


[ what I did ]  competitor analysis, expert interviews, ideation, conception, UX design, UI design, feedback evaluation


»Scope« is an e-mail client designed for the advanced business use, not only processing conventional event and task management, but offering additional features considered based on the results of a precedent expert survey:
    •    the inbox marginal column, which can be freely customised to organise e-mails for better synopsis or individual structuring – thus helping to focus on ongoing tasks (e.g. through postponing newsletters or e-mails that require further effort).
    •    the scope button, which supports a quick filtering of linked content by only one click, including all e-mails (in/outbox), attachments, events and tasks. 
In addition to the conventional list view, Scope also allows for individual preview and file searching of e-mail content and attachments. This defines Scope not only as a genuine e-mail application but a comprehensive archive for mails and any other kind of linked data.
Expert Interviews: In the beginning we interviewed some experts to get an idea of how they process their daily e-mail congestion: how and why are e-mails either kept or deleted, how are attachments handled and how do users manage their tasks or appointments from incoming mails.
Wireframes: Based on the experts' needs we created possible user scenarios and sketched them as wireframes. We defined all essential content and features and determined their positioning for an optimal user experience.
We then proceeded to develop these wireframes into a fully fleshed Visual Design, showing the elements in all their possible states (active, passive, hover, …). Despite having complex functionality the application had to be straight-forward and easy to grasp. That's why we agreed on a dark interface to help us focusing on active content.